Last edited by Malajar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of translocation of herbicides in plants. found in the catalog.

translocation of herbicides in plants.

James Harry Walmsley

translocation of herbicides in plants.

by James Harry Walmsley

  • 69 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Herbicides.,
  • Plants -- Assimilation.

  • The Physical Object
    Pagination17 l.
    Number of Pages17
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16720066M

    There have been numerous books written on the subject of soil/herbicide interactions. It is beyond the scope of this lesson to provide an in depth discussion of this topic; however, it is important for the learner to understand a few basic principles about the interaction of herbicides with soil organic matter and clay. Thorough coverage of the plant (inner and outer canopy) will result in greater amounts of translocated herbicides moved throughout the entire plant, and thus more complete control. During times of stress, photosynthesis rates are slowed, plants become less metabolically active, and movement of sugar throughout the plant is reduced.

    As a summary of diverse research information, this second edition of Herbicides and Plant Physiology is a valuable reference for students and researchers in plant physiology, crop production/protection, plant biochemistry, biotechnology and agriculture. All libraries in universities, agricultural colleges and research establishments where these subjects are studied and taught will need copies of this excellent book Cited by: Spray retention of crop protection agrochemicals on the plant surface. Co-penetration of actives and adjuvants and its significance for the matched pair liaison. Modeling xenobiotic uptake and movement ¿ a review. Comparison of translocation properties of insecticides verses herbicides that lead to efficacious control of pests as specifically illustrated by isoclast¿ active, a new insecticide and arylex¿ active, a new herbicide.

    Herbicides make a spectacular contribution to modern crop production. Yet, for the development of more effective and safer agrochemicals, it is essential to understand how these compounds work in plants and their surroundings. This expanded and fully revised second edition of Herbicides and Plant Physiology provides a comprehensive and up-to-date account of how modern herbicides interact with. It is a contact herbicide with slight translocation throughout the plant. Good spray coverage and sunlight are important for maximum efficacy. Injury Symptoms. Injury is similar to that of the cell membrane disrupter herbicides. Sensitive plants show "leaf burning," yellowing and browning, and eventual death after a week or so.


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Translocation of herbicides in plants by James Harry Walmsley Download PDF EPUB FB2

With the exception of herbicides that may act at the plasmalemma surface, herbicides must move across the plasmalemma prior to reaching the site of action. Several methods are used to determine herbicide translocation. Most commonly, translocation is determined by autoradiography of plants treated with radioactive by: 3.

herbicides, specific formulations, additives, or the effect of specific environmental parameters on herbicide behavior in plants. In recent years, many researchers have conducted herbicide absorption and translocation studies to elucidate herbicide resistance mechanisms in weeds such as horseweed [Conyza canadensis (L.) Cronq.] (Koger and Reddy.

Herbicides in this category can be divided into two groups, contact and systemic herbicides, according to their translocation characteristics in plants (Tucker and Singh, ; Mersie and Singh, ). Foliar applied herbicides have little or no soil activity, and can be applied as directed sprays on weeds under the tree canopy without causing any injury to citrus trees.

The herbicide translocates through the phloem to the roots, ideally killing the target weed and leaving neighboring vegetation untouched. A warning on the product sheet for Roundup reads “Avoid painting cut stumps with this product as injuryFile Size: 26KB.

Herbicide x Plant Interactions Absorption and Translocation of Herbicides Applied to Soil Herbicides are applied to soil to control seedling weeds as they emerge.

Many herbicides have only soil activity, i.e., they do not affect plants when applied to the foliage. To be effective, the herbicide must enter translocation of herbicides in plants. book plant. TRANSLOCATION OF HERBICIDES MEASURED BY PHYTOFLUOROGRAPHY 63 FiG. The phytofluorographs of wheat and other plants.

Left, a phytofluorograph of cotyledons of morning glory (top) and cotton (bottom), first leaves of corn (left) and wheat (right) treated with by: 9.

An important aspect of agrochemical effectiveness is the ability of a pesticide to translocate in the plant to the relevant site of action, for herbicides movement to the meristem for control of weeds and for insecticides movement to the plant tissue used by insects as a food source.

For modern synthetic insecticides, the most effective mode of translocation in plants is via xylem. The mode-of-action is the overall manner in which a herbicide affects a plant at the tissue or cellular level. Herbicides with the same mode-of- action will have the same translocation (movement) pattern and produce similar injury symptoms.

b) Enhanced metabolism of the herbicide: Some plants have evolved resistance by developing the ability to metabolize or break down the chemical to nonactive compounds.

c) Reduced translocation: Herbicides can be translocated in the xylem, phloem, or both. Some plants have been able to show resistance by reducing the translocation of.

For chemical weed control in fields of crops, the herbicide products that can be used must fulfill two contradictory objectives: control the weed plants but not injure the crop plants.

Some herbicides provide these features innately (e.g. atrazine for weed control in corn).Cited by: Retention, Uptake, and Translocation of Agrochemicals in Plants aims to update current knowledge with new studies that contain new findings on the uptake, translocation, and distribution of agrochemicals in plants as well as provide review-style chapters that summarize existing information on specific subjects.

This volume will serve as a. In general each chapter about a given class of herbicides is presented in the following sequential form: Introduction; Growth and Plant Structure; Absorption and Translocation; Molecular Fate Author: Surinder Singh Rana.

• Soil-applied herbicides • Interfere with new growth and reduce theInterfere with new growth and reduce the ability of seedlings to develop normally • Plants take up herbicides afterPlants take up herbicides after • Translocation is limited with root or shoot.

Herbicide Absorption and Translocation in Plants using Radioisotopes - Volume 63 Issue SP1 - Vijay K. Nandula, William K. Vencill Skip to main content Accessibility help We use cookies to Cited by:   A comprehensive reference-cum-textbook on fundamentals and principles of weed science.

Includes updated information on newer approaches (ecophysiological and biological) in weed management, newer herbicides, bioherbicides, herbicide action mechanisms and transformations in plants, herbicide persistence and behaviour in soil and environment, and interaction of herbicide Reviews: 2.

In recent decades, repeated use of herbicides in the same field has imposed selection for resistance in species that were formerly susceptible. On the other hand, considerable research in the private and public sectors has been directed towards introducing herbicide tolerance into susceptible crop species.

The evolution of herbicide resistance, understanding its mechanisms, characterisation of. deBoer and N. Satchivi, Comparison of Translocation Properties of Insecticides versus Herbicides That Leads To Efficacious Control of Pests As Specifically Illustrated by Isoclast™ Active, a New Insecticide, and Arylex™ Active, a New Herbicide, Retention, Uptake, and Translocation of Agrochemicals in Plants, /bkch Cited by:   BRASSINOSTEROID-SIGNALING KINASE5 Associates with Immune Receptors and Is Required for Immune Responses.

Herbicide Mode of Action How a herbicide works Use herbicides more efficiently Recognize and diagnose injury problems Herbicide resistance management. Herbicide –Plant Interactions Absorption Translocation Metabolism Mechanism of Action Physiological response.

Requirements for Herbicide Activity Contact with the target weed. Authors. Scott J. Nissen, Department of Bioagricultural Sciences and Pest Management, Colorado State University ; Tracy M. Sterling, Department of Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed Science, New Mexico State University.

Comparison of Translocation Properties of Insecticides versus Herbicides That Leads To Efficacious Control of Pests As Specifically Illustrated by Isoclast™ Active, a New Insecticide, and Arylex™ Active, a New Herbicide.

G. J. deBoer; N. Satchivi. Translocation of glyphosate was closely related to its absorption (r value ) with approximately 15% more of the applied dose being mobilized in transgenic plants than the parental controls. Analysis of electronic autoradiograms along the treated leaf lamina found discrete internal regions of glyphosate accumulation closely associated with Cited by: Plants with 4–6 leaves showed lower absorption and translocation of the herbicide to the leaf/root regions compared with plants at the beginning of their development.